Why Vegan?

The Connection Between Humans, Animals and the Planet



Too often human beings fail to see the interconnection that exists between the non-human animals and the environment that surrounds us. As some vegans adopt a plant-based diet upon learning about the suffering of farmed animals, others are influenced by the devastating impact of animal agriculture on the environment, while many make the switch to benefi t their own health. The truth is, these issues are not separate.

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, the livestock sector consumes more edible protein—40 percent of the entire world’s agricultural output—than it produces, while occupying 30 percent of the planet’s total land surface.

Animal-based foods such as meat, dairy and eggs are highly resource-intensive, compared to plant-based foods. Product labeling indicating varying levels of humane and sustainable practices entices conscious consumers, but is often misleading. As an example, it cannot be assumed that a grass-fed label is indicative of sustainability. Living conditions involve less suffering and fossil fuel use than in factory farms, but according to a study published in Environmental Science and Technology, pasture-raised cattle produce at least 20 percent more methane than grain-fi nished animals, on a per-pound-of-meat basis, and they also require more land and water.

The United Nations reports that at least 20 million people worldwide die each year as a result of malnutrition, while estimates have been made that if Americans alone reduced their meat intake by just 10 percent, 100 million people could be fed with the land, water and energy that would be freed up as a result. As pointed out by The World Watch Institute, the continued growth of meat output creates competition for grain between affl uent meat-eaters and the world’s poor.

As much of the world’s population struggles to obtain enough food, many Americans are consuming too much protein and suffering from “diseases of affl uence” that correlate with the consumption of animal protein.

But there is good reason for hope, as a growing body of nutrition science shows that a high percentage of these diseases can be prevented, or even reversed, with diet. According to Nutritional Biochemist T. Colin Campbell, who co-authored The China Study, “The same diet that is good for prevention of cancer is also good for the prevention of heart disease, obesity, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis and other diseases. That diet is a whole foods, plant-based diet.”

Note that there’s more to worry about than the antibiotics, steroids and hormones found in most animal products available today, making organic options less than ideal as well. “The real danger of animal products is the nutrient imbalances, regardless of the presence or absence of those nasty chemicals. Long before modern chemicals were introduced into our food, people still began to experience more cancer and more heart disease when they started to eat more animal-based foods,” says Campbell.

Is it a coincidence that the diet that can prevent suffering of animals is the same diet that can reverse the process of global warming and keep humans healthy into old age? What is good for the animals is good for the planet and good for our own health.

Tracey Narayani Glover, JD, E-RYT 200, is an animal advocate, writer, chef/ owner of The Pure Vegan and a yoga and meditation teacher in Mobile, AL. Connect at ThePureVegan.com and ARCForAllBeings.org

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