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Natural Awakenings Boston

Organizing and Our Chakras: Declutter for Emotional Well-Being

Oct 07, 2019 05:03PM

Energy that can flow freely though balanced chakras leads to abundance in health and emotional well-being. Disorganization and clutter block the flow of energy. Being unwilling to let go of items causes pain by clinging to the past. As we clear our space, we often find wonderful gifts that we either didn’t know existed or were buried.

Two of the seven chakras that benefit the most by decluttering and organizing are the sacral and the heart chakra. The sacral chakra is about emotions, stability and flow. An unbalanced chakra can lead to excessive emotional attachments to people and things. 

We attach emotions, both good and bad, to our stuff. These emotions can be an attachment to the past or an anxiety about the future. Meditation on the sacral chakra often includes taking a deep breath in and then breathing out slowly, letting go of what no longer serves us. Organizing and decluttering is all about helping people let go of what no longer serves them both physically and emotionally.

The heart chakra is about touch and compassion leading to balance, calmness and serenity. Blockage at the heart chakra renders us unable to detach and accept. It is about holding on too tightly to the past and feeling stressed and anxious. It may cause us to push others away. Clutter is an outward sign of that blockage. Clutter represents unfinished business and is the physical manifestation of fears, regrets, anxiety about the future or procrastination.


 Some excuses we tell ourselves:
 I might need it someday. If you do, go buy another.

 It was a gift. The purpose of a gift is to convey a feeling. By disposing of the gift, you are not disposing of the feeling you experienced when you received it.

 It’s my collection. Collections have a way of growing out of control and they need to be edited periodically. Keep the ones you truly love and display them properly so you can visually enjoy them. Promise yourself, when you make a thoughtful addition to the collection, remove one that holds less joy.

I don’t have time. Hire a professional to streamline the process.

I don’t know where to start. Organizing is a skill set that everyone doesn’t have. It’s no different than a person that is good with numbers vs. someone that is good with their hands. Work with a professional or start small with one drawer. 

It was my mother’s, grandfather’s, friend’s, etc., whom are no longer with us. Unless you love it, are using it or displaying it, you are not honoring their memory.

Keeping clothes that no longer fit. This is one of the most common excuses for both men and women and it has the power to instantly make someone feel bad about themselves. If you have lost weight, hanging onto clothes that are too big keeps the possibility alive in your mind that you will regain the weight. If the opposite is true, then holding on to clothes in the hope that they will fit again one day reminds us of what we have not accomplished. When you accomplish your goal reward yourself with new, stylish clothes.

As we clear and organize our space, our mind also clears. Clutter limits how we physically live in our space and the sight of it keeps us buried emotionally. Every time we view our unfinished business, it reminds us, even if for only a nanosecond, of stuff we have yet to handle. These reminders keep us tethered to the past and/or anxious about our future. If it is hidden clutter, it can feel like an embarrassing kept secret, which can lead to feelings of shame. 

We can transform the way we live and work by managing our belongings so that they don’t manage us.


Advertorial by Linda Strocky

Linda Strocky was a project manager for more than 25 years. She transferred that experience and skills into helping people transform their lives through organizing and decluttering. Contact her at 401-654-8182 or [email protected].


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